# Title Days Time Location Instructor
/MDVST 200C Intro to Medieval Studies
English  
2C World History
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed History 2CH.
 
Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1700 to present.
Henderson  
2A World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from prehistory to 1000 CE.  

Lee  
4C Modern Europe
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed History 4CH.
 
Survey of the history of Modern Europe, 1650-present. Discusses the major social, political, religious, and cultural characteristics and developments of the period, as well as key interactions between Europe and other parts of the world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.
Rappaport  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.  

Digeser  
17C American People

World War I to the present. A survey of the leading issues in American life from colonial times to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.  

Yaqub  
46A The Middle East from Muhammad to the Nineteenth Century

Introduces students to the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam until the nineteenth-century Ottoman reforms known as the Tanzimat. Subjects covered include the early caliphates, the influence of Turkic and Mongolian peoples on the region, the Crusades and jihad, the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties, and the interactions between people of different cultural and religious backgrounds in the region.  

Sabra  
49A Survey of African History

Prehistory to c. 1800. History 49-A- B-C is a general survey course designed to introduce students to major themes in African history. The course focuses on organization of production, state formation, African civilizations and identities, science and technology, beliefs and knowledge systems, Africa’s interaction with the world economy, such as through enslavement and slave trades. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during lecture.  

Ware  
107C The Darwinian Revolution and Modern Biology

Examines the social and scientific impacts of evolutionary ideas from around 1800 through Charles Darwin, the modern evolutionary synthesis, the birth of ecology, and molecular biology. Focus is on America and Western Europe.

T/R 2:00-3:15pm GIRV 2112 Aronova  
114A History of Christianity: Beginning to 800

The history of Christian communities and doctrines from the first through the eighth centuries. Special emphasis on Christians’ evolving relationships with pagan and Jewish communities throughout the Mediterranean world.  

Digeser  
121F France in the Seventeenth Century

This course focuses on the history of France from the reign of Henri IV (1595) to the end of the reign of Louis XIV (1715). Topics will include court culture and politics, religious tensions and experiences of French Protestants, natural philosophy, social upheaval and gender relations, French colonial endeavors.

Bernstein  
127F The French Revolution

The French Revolution was a globally significant historical event. The ideas of liberty and equality articulated through the storming of the Bastille and Declaration of the Rights of Man were radical and volatile, and the Revolution engendered modern notions of republicanism, democracy and citizenship. This was also, however, a period of war, violence and terror, which incited conflicts and upheaval across the world. We will explore the multiple meanings of the French Revolution, and its enduring global ramifications and legacies.

Covo  
129D Europe in the Eighteenth Century

Economic, social, political, and intellectual history of the eighteenth century. 1715 to 1763.  

Sonnino  
135C History of Russia

1917-present. A history of the Soviet Union from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to its collapse, focusing on political and social history.  

Edgar  
146BQ Readings Seminar in the Body and Revolution in Middle East History

How does the body become a political symbol in various moments of revolt and uprising? What can these experiences and representations tell us about the very possibility of change? What can it reveal about political economy, sex, gender, torture and brutality? This course seeks to answer these questions through a study of the histories of the body and revolution in the Middle East.  

Seikaly  
147G Gender and Power in Modern African History

Examination of gender, power, and authority among and between men and women in response to socioeconomic transformations in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Africa. Themes include interpretations of gender, organization of labor, the missionary project, the state, and colonial rule.  

Miescher  
151R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Latin American History

A research seminar in Latin American history. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required.  

Araiza Kokinis  
156A History of Mexico: Pre-Hispanic and Colonial Periods

The history of colonial New Spain, from California to Central America and from the Philippines to the Caribbean. Topics include pre-Columbian societies, including the Aztecs; the formation and development of colonial societies; religion; the economy; and global connections.  

Same course as LAIS 156A

Cobo  
159C Women in Twentieth Century American History

A continuation of History 159A. From 1900 to the present.  

Case  
161B Colonial and Revolutionary America

A social and political history of colonial and revolutionary America with emphasis on the interaction of Native Americans, Europeans, and African Americans. The course will combine lectures with discussion of both primary and secondary sources. From mid-eighteenth century to 1800.  

Plane  
161R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Early American History

Students will conduct historical research in early American history in a seminar context. An original and substantial research paper is required.  

Plane  
164IB American Immigration

U.S. immigration history from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Examines forces that brought people from various parts of the globe to the U.S., their experiences in migrating and in subsequent generations, and enduring racial and ethnic hierarchies.  

Spickard  
166LB American Legal History

The history of the U.S. Supreme Court, legal thought, legal education and the legal profession since the late nineteenth century.

Zipperstein  
173T American Environmental History

Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 173.

Traces the history of American attitudes and behavior toward nature. Focus on wilderness, the conservation movement, and modern forms of environmentalism.
Adams  
174Q Capstone Seminar in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice

Capstone seminar for the Minor in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice. Students participate in structured discussion and in-depth reflection of the knowledge acquired through interdisciplinary coursework and internship experiences, to produce a final paper, series of essays or policy briefs, and/or other kinds of creative products in consultation with the course instructor. Students will present their work at a public symposium, providing an opportunity to hone their public speaking skills, while contributing to community understanding of how poverty and inequality can be addressed through purposive social research and action.

Cohen  
176R Undergraduate Research Seminar in the History of Drugs and Alcohol

Recommended Preparation: HIST 9 and WRIT 109HU

A research seminar that explores the role of alcohol and other drugs in everyday life; why different societies have regulated certain drugs more stringently than others; and how contested moralities have shaped conflict over drug regulation and enforcement. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.  
Jacobson  
184R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Early Chinese History
Specific topics will differ from year to year. Through readings and discussion students will explore a topic or problem in the history of Pre-Modern China. The course will culminate with a 10-20 page research paper.
Zuo  
184A History of China
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chinese 184A. Not open for credit to students who have completed History 186A or Chinese 186A.
 
Ancient China to 589ce.
Barbieri  
187S The Samurai

The samurai of Japan were a hereditary military class that evolved over a millennium. Course traces this history and clarifies the range of differences that separated samurai in each era as their roles and ideologies changed.

Roberts  
193F Food in World History

Explores the cultural, economic, and geopolitical roles of food and drink in world history. Topics include: trade, production, and consumption; global food chains; morality and food reform; identities and body image; scarcity, food scares, and food security.

Jacobson  
196JA-JC Internship in Scholarly Publishing

Through this year-long internship, students will work under faculty direction to produce an issue of the UCSB History Department’s Undergraduate Journal. Students will meet every two weeks and gain practical experience in scholarly publishing disseminating calls for papers, soliciting undergraduate contributions, locating peer reviewers, facilitating revisions with authors, and bibliographic and copywriting work. They will also gain a working knowledge of the UCSB Library’s online publication platform, which will host the journal. Students will utilize various digital humanities tools – podcasts, social media, websites – to promote the undergraduate research being published in Journal as well as host an annual showcase of scholars’ work.

Enrollment comments: This is part one of a two quarter internship. Students will earn 4 units total upon completion of HIST 196JA and 196JB. Use HIST 196JC to earn credit for journal participation beyond two quarters. 

Henderson  
197LA Art and Culture in Latin America’s Cold War

This is a special topics course. The detailed course description will not appear in GOLD, but will be posted here once provided by the instructor. 

Araiza Kokinis  
201AF Advanced Historical Literature: Africa
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. Open to both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.
A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. AF: Africa.
 
Miescher  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Latin Paleography

Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. Open to both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. E: Europe.
English  
201ME Advanced Historical Literature: Middle East
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. Open to both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.
 
A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. ME: Middle East.
Seikaly  
201S Topics in the History of Science
Intensive study of specific problems in the history of science. Topics vary from year to year, and students may therefore repeat the course for credit.
 
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit.
 
This graduate level readings course examines the histories of nuclear weapons and
nuclear war. One main goal is to explore the role of nuclear weapons as historical actors
and threats/fears of nuclear war as a force that shaped the 20 th century. In other words –
nuclear bombs are more than weapons of war and mass destruction and they produce
particular cultural, social, and political effects that differ over time and across space. This
part of the course will focus primarily on states with nuclear weapons (or those that want
them). Another goal is to think about various manifestations of “nuclearity” from the
discovery of radioactivity c. 1900 to the present-day. Because I am historian of science
and technology, my approach to the topic comes from that perspective. But I interested in
the intersection of nuclear war/weapons with political, social, environmental, et al.
histories as well. This is not a course in Cold War diplomacy or international relations,
however! It is a course that examines, from a comparative perspective, the social,
political, environmental, ethical, and cultural transformations that occur once a state
acquires either nuclear bombs or nuclear energy.
McCray  
201RE Advanced Historical Literature: Race and Ethnicity
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. Open to both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.
 
A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. RE: Race and Ethnicity.
Spickard  
210RB Race, Religion, and Revolution

How do human beings manage relations between the seen and unseen worlds? This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between spirituality and radical social change, especially?though not exclusively?among people of color. Visiting scholars and activists will workshop or present original research rooted in the humanities and social sciences and graduate students will read and respond to their work as they develop their own research questions. Short weekly reading responses and one 8-10 page paper are required each term. The goal is to foster collaborative interdisciplinary scholarship on the intersection of racial, religious, and revolutionary thought and practice, irrespective of period or place. 2-quarter course.

Ware  
223B Seminar in Modern European History
A research seminar in selected topics in the history of Europe, 1815 to the present.  
 
Enrollment Comments: A two-quarter in-progress sequence course with grades for both quarters issued upon completion of History 223B.
 
Research Seminar in Modern and Early Modern European History (Winter-Spring). This two-quarter seminar will focus on researching and writing an article-length research paper or dissertation chapter. Any research topic related to Europe, including European empires and/or relations with European countries, from c. 1500-present, will be considered appropriate for this seminar. Our methodological focus(es) will depend on the projects of the participants. I expect to invite a few guest discussants on topics of interest to the class.
Bernstein  
253A Special Seminar in Latin American History
Enrollment Comments: Two-quarter sequence course; final grade given upon completion of History253B. May be repeated for credit.
 
A two-quarter special seminar on a given topic. Students will produce a chapter-length paper or publishable article.
Cobo  
282G Global South Asia

This graduate reading course on Global South Asia introduces students to the scope of historical research on South Asia’s global connections between 1600 and 1960. The course covers sources, methods, and literature from South Asia in connection with works on Eastern and Southern Africa, the Indian Ocean World, the Middle East, East and South East Asia, and Western Europe. Using themes like capital, empire and the body, this course examines South Asia’s relevance in transnational history. This course trains graduate students to see scale as a fundamental problem in global methods, understand how it has been experienced and historicized, and the role of comparison and connectivity in analyzing South Asia and the wider world.  

Chattopadhyaya  
289B Seminar in Chinese History
A research seminar on selected problems in Chinese history. Some working knowledge of the Chinese language desirable but not necessary.
Barbieri  
292C Foundations of U.S. History, 1917-Present

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes, and literature in the history of the United States, from 1917 to the present. Historiographical in nature, the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

Yaqub  
295GS Gender and Sexualities Colloquium

This year-long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students and UCSB scholars who study the histories of women, gender, or sexuality across time and space. It introduces students to current literature and contemporary debates through readings, discussion, and public presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars, and graduate students. Participants will meet every other week. Preparation might include coordinating readings for discussion, writing a chapter/article for peer review, or presenting original research to colloquium members.  

Henderson  
295PH Public History Colloquium

A year-long professional colloquium on major topics and new work in Public History. Leading practitioners share theory and practice of the discipline in talks, workshops and occasional field visits. Relevant reading and writing assigned. Meets three to four times per quarter. 

Spring 2021:

HISTORY 295PH (1 or 2 units), meets Fridays, 12-2:50 via Zoom;

One meeting per month (TBD), with public presentation from a working public historian/scholar/activist with faculty, students, staff and community covering major topics and new directions in Public History.  Additional meetings as recommended, but not required. The last hour of each session (1:50-2:50) is reserved for enrolled students and instructor with (usually) the guest(s) to provide deeper response to and/or analysis of the required readings.  Topics vary but are intended to represent some of the breadth and depth of public history scholarship and practice, both nationally and internationally. Brief response papers required (2-3 pp of all enrolled students) with those enrolled for 2 units completing a slightly longer (6-8 page) analysis on a mutually agreed-upon topic of public history literature.  Colloquium runs all year, and students enroll each quarter for the number of units they prefer; students not enrolled may also, of course, attend the colloquium, which is open to the entire campus community.

Public Historical Studies Colloquium Schedule 2020-2021

Plane  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

McCray  
295AL Seminar in Latin American History

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working on the history of Latin America. Meets throughout the academic year.

Cobo