# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2B World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1000 to 1700 CE.

T/R 8-9:15am GIRV 1004 Thompson  
2C World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1700 to present.

 

 

T/R 9:30-10:45am IV Theater 1 Henderson  
7 Great Issues in the History of Public Policy

Broad exploration of great issues in the history of public policy from ancient times to present, to understand basic ways in which societies make their major decisions, the shared dynamics in the process, and how varied settings affect it.

T/R 11am-12:15pm HFH 1104 Bergstrom  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

T/R 2-3:15pm GIRV 1116 Chattopadhyaya  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

W/F 2-3:15pm GIRV 2112 Marcuse  
17A The American People

Colonial through Jacksonian era. A survey of the leading issues in American life from colonial times to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

M/W 3:30-4:45pm IV Theater 1 Maar  
49C Survey of African History

1945 to present. History 49-A- B-C is a general survey course designed to introduce students to major themes in African history. The course focuses on colonialism and decolonization, nationalism and self-liberation, development and neocolonialism, Cold War contexts, as well as African experiences of independence and the everyday in our contemporary, global world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during lecture.

T/R 3:30-4:45pm CHEM 1171 Miescher  
56 Introduction to Mexican History

An introduction to the basic issues and themes of Mexican history, from the pre-Hispanic era to the present.

M/W 5-6:15pm HFH 1104 Carrillo  
74 Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice in Historical and Global Context

Historical and interdisciplinary perspectives on poverty and inequality globally and in the U.S., tracing structural transformations, shifting modes of thought, policy, and action, dynamics of class, racial, gender, ethnic and geographic stratification, and major theoretical debates from antiquity through the present. Course features guest lectures to introduce students to varied conceptual and methodological approaches to studying poverty and inequality, and draws on readings, discussion, writing, and related assignments to explore issues within a social justice framework.

M/W 2-3:15pm HFH 1104 O'Connor  
88 Survey of South Asian History

An introduction to the history of the South Asian subcontinent, with emphasis on the period from 1500 CE to the present.

T/R 5-6:15pm PSYCH 1924 Chattopadhyaya  
115B The World of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500

Explores the overlapping worlds of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500: the vibrant merchant culture; the elegant courts of princes; intellectual circles like the Platonic Academy; famed mercenary captains and their troops; the underworld of male same sex relations, of criminality and prostitution; the lives of women in marriages, in convents and in poorhouses; the workshops and homes of the laboring poor. One central theme is the culture of patronage and the production of extraordinary art.

T/R 12:30-1:45pm GIRV 2112 Yamboliev  
118B Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain: Conquest, Colonization, and Coexistence

Assesses the more than seven centuries of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence (convivencia) in the Iberian peninsula, examing intercultural and interfaith relations from the time of the Visigoths (fifth century) to the expulsion of the Moriscos (Muslim converts to Christianity) in 1609.

M/W 3:30-4:45pm GIRV 2112 Blumenthal  
127A History of the French Empire

“Liberty, equality, fraternity”: what does this revolutionary motto mean from a colonial perspective? France, often characterized as “the country of human rights,” also has a long imperial history that sheds light on key contradictions of modernity: democracy and populism, citizenship and inequality, colorblindness and racism. Countries as different as Canada, Haiti, Algeria, Vietnam, Senegal, India and even the United States share a common French colonial past: how did these French roots of globalization define the world as we know it?

M/W 5-6:15pm 387 1015 Covo  
129A Europe in the Seventeenth Century

Economic, social, political, and intellectual history of the seventeenth century: 1610-1648.

T/R 2-3:15pm 387 1015 Sonnino  
129Q Readings in Early Modern Europe

This course will be a discussion, reading of a single document, and critique of your peers’ papers. Certain principles and rules for the study of history will be discussed. The main thrust of the course, however, is the analysis and writing of one or two short (500 to 600) word papers on some excerpts translated from one of Richelieu’s most famous writings, The Political Testament.

R 4-6:50pm HSSB 4041 Sonnino  
142AL American Legal & Constitutional History

The U.S. Supreme Court has weighed in on the nation’s most significant social questions ranging from segregation to same-sex marriage and women’s work. Designed to put these and other decisions in proper context, this course covers U.S. legal history from the founding period to the present, with special attention to the evolution of legal conceptions of property, race and gender, civil rights, and criminal justice. Students must read critically and make arguments based on evidence.

T/R 12:30-1:45pm IV Theater 2 Perrone  
145A The Middle East I: From the Origins of Islam to the Year 1000

The rise of a world religion and the emergence of a new multi-ethnic society under its aegis; the evolution of social and political institutions within the Universal caliphate; the creation of a specifically Islamic culture and intellectual life.

T/R 9:30-10:45am 387 1011 Sabra  
146R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Through readings and discussion, students will explore a broad problem or topic in the history of the Middle East or wider Islamic world. The course will culminate with a research paper or historiographical review essay.

M 3-5:50pm HSSB 4020 Sabra  
148B Colonial Southern Africa

Focuses on the history of Southern Africa under colonial rule to independence (late 1880s-1994). Explores the imposition of European settler rule, African resistance, the political economies of the different colonial regimes, the rise of African nationalism and independence.

T/R 12:30-1:45pm GIRV 1116 Chikowero  
148PL Politics and Leisure in Africa

The intersection between leisure and politics is a consistent feature of African history, and it is a complex, creative intersection that produces and transacts history in dynamic ways. Utilizing ancient transcripts and records of performative cultures, contemporary music, primary and secondary interpretations of African cultural life, this course provides a deep and timely exploration of the fertile intersection between cultural performativity and power from ancient times to the present. Performative cultures are therefore political, and so also are they spiritual, economic and deeply embedded in questions of science and technology.

M/W 9:30-10:45am 387 1015 Chikowero  
159B Women in American History

Social history of women in America from 1800 to 1900. Changing marriage, reproduction and work patterns, and cultural values about the female role. Attention to racial, class and ethnic differences. Analysis of feminist thought and the several women’s movements.

M/W/F 11-11:50am Buchanan 1920 Case  
161B Colonial and Revolutionary America

A social and political history of colonial and revolutionary America with emphasis on the interaction of Native Americans, Europeans, and African Americans. The course will combine lectures with discussion of both primary and secondary sources. From mid-eighteenth century to 1800.

T/R 9:30-10:45am HSSB 4020 Plane  
166R Undergraduate Research Seminar in 20th Century U.S. History

A undergraduate research seminar on US history designed to guide students in doing research. Each student will produce a substantial research paper on some aspect of American politics and/or culture since 1900.

W 9-11:50am HSSB 4020 Kalman  
172B Politics and Public Policy in the United States

The interaction of politics and public policy from the revolution to the present, focusing upon the key issues of each era in social, economic, cultural, racial, and other policy areas. A particular concern for the policy-making process, ideology, and the cultural origins of politics.

M/W 2-3:15pm TD-W 1701 Bergstrom  
174B Wealth and Poverty in America

Changing patterns and conceptions of inequality, seventeenth century to present. Examines influence of economic transformation, race, gender, class, attitudes towards work and welfare, social movements, social knowledge, law and public policy on opportunity, income, status, and power.Divides at Civil War and World War II.

T/R 3:30-4:45pm 387 1015 Genens  
187A Japan Under the Tokugawa Shoguns

A survey of Japanese social and cultural history from the mid-sixteenth century to the nineteenth century.

M/W 9:30-10:45am 387 1011 Bovbjerg
194AH Senior Honors Seminar

Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.

R 12-2:50pm HSSB 4020 Chavez-Garcia  
200AS Historical Literature: Asia

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.

R 3-5:50pm HSSB 4020 Zheng  
200AS Historical Literature: Asia

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.

T 9-11:50am HSSB 4041 McDonald  
201AM Advanced Historical Literature

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. AM. America.

This graduate reading seminar will address the history and historiography of slavery in the Americas. We will consider the classics that helped define the field, works that have sparked controversy, and some of the most recent offerings in the history of slavery. Though primarily focused on the institution of slavery that developed in the British colonies and later in the United States, we will approach slavery comparatively. We will also examine the institution from variety of perspectives, including the law(s) of slavery, slavery as an economic practice and system of labor, slavery as a cultural, social, and gendered experience, and the politics of slavery. Reading widely and considering slavery from many vantages will help us understand it as a multifaceted phenomenon that shaped the development of the Atlantic World, British North America, and ultimately, the United States.

W 2-4:50pm HSSB 2252 Perrone  
201E Advanced Historical Literature

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. E. Europe.

T 2-4:50pm HSSB 4041 Lee  
201HT Advanced Historical Literature: History of Technology

This graduate level readings seminar provides a survey of key works in the history of technology. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.

M 9-11:50am HSSB 4020 McCray  
215E Research Seminar in Medieval Social History

A two-quarter graduate research seminar in medieval social history.

M 10am-12:50pm HSSB 4041 Blumenthal  English  
221B Research Seminar in Transnational Empire

A two-quarter research seminar that explores the history of modern empire from a transnational perspective. Open to graduate students in any area field.

W 9-11:50am HSSB 4041 McDonald  
224A Research Seminar in Race, Gender, and Inequality

A two-quarter research seminar focusing on race, gender, and inequality in U.S. history and beyond. This is the first class of the two-quarter sequence.

T 11am-1:50pm HSSB 4020 Chavez-Garcia  
267A Seminar in American Economic History

Seminar in American economic history.

M 2-4:50pm HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
287J Reinventing “Japan” Colloquium

This year long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students who study Japanese history and culture. It introduces current scholarship on Japan via readings, discussions and presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars and graduate students. The colloquium meets bi- weekly. Students will prepare readings for discussion, write a seminar-length paper and present their paper to the colloquium once during the year.

W 4-5:30pm HSSB 4041 Lewallen
292A Foundations of U.S. History to 1846

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes, and literature in the history of the United States, from colonial origins to 1846. Historiographical in nature, the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

W 9-11:50am HSSB 2252 Plane  
294 Colloquium in Work, Labor, and Political Economy

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

F 1-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

T 3:30-5:30pm HSSB 6056 Aronova