# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2A World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from prehistory to 1000 CE.  

Digeser  
2B World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1000 to 1700 CE.  

Roberts  
4B Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Survey of the history of Europe in the Medieval and Early Modern periods, 800-1700. Discusses the major social, political, religious, and cultural characteristics and developments of the period, as well as key interactions between Europe and other parts of the world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.  

Bernstein  
8 Introduction to History of Latin America

Deals with major issues in Latin America’s historical formation: pre-Hispanic cultures, Spanish conquest, role of colonial institutions, development of trade, eighteenth- century reform, independence, formation of nations; and identify major issues in current Latin American affairs.  

Méndez Gastelumendi  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.  

Lansing  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.  

Majewski  
17B The American People

Sectional crisis through progressivism. A survey of the leading issues in American life from colonial times to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.  

Perrone  
22 Technology and the Modern World

As much as religion or politics, technology has played a central, yet often overlooked role, in the shaping of the modern world. This lower-division undergraduate course presents a social history of technology from roughly the 17th century to the early 21st century. This course is based around a framework of the individuals, issues, and ideas that shaped the development of different technologies and the ways these interacted with one another across time, space, and peoples. In studying this history, we do not accept technology uncritically. Rather, we learn how its use has acted as a powerful force in modern society.  

McCray  
49C Survey of African History

1945 to present. History 49-A- B-C is a general survey course designed to introduce students to major themes in African history. The course focuses on colonialism and decolonization, nationalism and self-liberation, development and neocolonialism, Cold War contexts, as well as African experiences of independence and the everyday in our contemporary, global world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during lecture.  

TBA
87 Japanese History Through Art and Literature

A basic introduction to the history of Japanese culture from its origins to the present day, with particular emphasis on the evidence of architecture and painting (presented through audiovisual modules). Selected examples of fiction and poetry will also be used.  

McDonald  
100H Historical Writing

An intermediate level honors seminar in which students read and critique major primary and secondary works from a variety of periods and regions.  

Yaqub  
101MQ Readings in the Social History of Money and Debt

This course asks students to consider money as a social relation in world history: as a moral obligation, a shared language, and a political bond. We will investigate the ancient foundations of money and debt; how different monetary forms have been shaped by politics, society, and culture; and how money has functioned as a means of rule, technology of power, and tool of discipline. This course is reading intensive and spans the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, political science, and literary criticism. Topics include cross-cultural currencies, counterfeiting, and money under neoliberalism, with special attention to the relationship between differential access to money and systems of race, class, and gender.  

Moore  
107C The Darwinian Revolution and Modern Biology

Examines the social and scientific impacts of evolutionary ideas from around 1800 through Charles Darwin, the modern evolutionary synthesis, the birth of ecology, and molecular biology. Focus is on America and Western Europe. 

Aronova  
111T Topics in Greek History

Undergraduate lecture course on ancient Greek history. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter  

Lee  
115B The Worlds of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500

Explores the overlapping worlds of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500: the vibrant merchant culture; the elegant courts of princes; intellectual circles like the Platonic Academy; famed mercenary captains and their troops; the underworld of male same sex relations, of criminality and prostitution; the lives of women in marriages, in convents and in poorhouses; the workshops and homes of the laboring poor. One central theme is the culture of patronage and the production of extraordinary art.  

Lansing  
118A The Crusades in Cross-Cultural Perspectives

Through the analysis of Latin Christian, Byzantine, Jewish, and Muslim sources, this course considers the development of the concept of the crusades and the progress of the crusading movement from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries.

Blumenthal  
121R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Early Modern Europe, 1450-1700

A seminar in early modern European history, 1450-1700. Students develop research skills and use them to complete a research topic of their choice in early modern European history. Emphases will vary with instructor and offering.  

Bernstein  
123R Undergraduate Research Seminar in the History of Europe, 1789-Present

Research seminar in the history of Europe from 1789 to the present. Students conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying on original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required.  

Covo  
127A History of the French Empire

“Liberty, equality, fraternity”: what does this revolutionary motto mean from a colonial perspective? France, often characterized as “the country of human rights,” also has a long imperial history that sheds light on key contradictions of modernity: democracy and populism, citizenship and inequality, colorblindness and racism. Countries as different as Canada, Haiti, Algeria, Vietnam, Senegal, India and even the United States share a common French colonial past: how did these French roots of globalization define the world as we know it?  

Covo  
129E Europe in the Eighteenth Century

Economic, social, political, and intellectual history of the eighteenth century. 1763 to 1789.

Sonnino  
129Q Readings in Early Modern Europe

This course will be a discussion, reading of a single document, and critique of your peers’ papers. Certain principles and rules for the study of history will be discussed. The main thrust of the course, however, is the analysis and writing of one or two short (500 to 600) word papers on some excerpts translated from one of Richelieu’s most famous writings, The Political Testament.  

Sonnino  
145C The Middle East III: Early Modern Empires and Transformations, 1500-1800

A survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of the Safavid Empire in Iran and the Ottoman conquest of the Mamluk Empire until the French occupation of Egypt and the first Ottoman attempts at modernizing reform.  

Sabra  
149AD Blackness in Latin America, An Introduction

Explores the experiences of Africans and their descendants in the Americas, mostly in Latin America and the Caribbean. Looks at ways in which men and women (enslaved and free) negotiated their imposed conditions from the colonial period to the present. Considers the methodological challenges of writing a history of people who did not produce primary sources. Underscores the contribution that people of African-descent have made and the debates that continue shaping the discipline.  

Laurent-Perrault  
149IA Islam in Africa

Africa is the only continent with a Muslim majority, with more than a quarter of the world’s Muslims living there. Americans tend to associate Islam with Arabs, but Africans greatly outnumber Arabs in the religion. There are more Muslims in Nigeria than in Egypt, more in Ethiopia than Iraq. 1/6th of the world’s Muslims reside in sub-Saharan Africa. How did this come to be? How has the adoption of Islam by Africans shaped their history? And, conversely, how have Africans shaped Islam? We answer these questions by exploring 14 centuries of Islamic African history. We also explore Islam as a system of religious meaning by studying the teachings and writings of African Muslims.  

Ware  
164C Civil War and Reconstruction

A history of the United States during the second half of the nineteenth century. Emphasis is placed on the causes of the Civil War, the outstanding developments of the war itself, and the major consequences of the reconstruction period.  

Kretz  
164R Undergraduate Research Seminar in the Civil War and Reconstruction

Research seminar on events leading up to the outbreak of the Civil War. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.

Kretz  
165S Political and Legal Scandals in U.S. History

Examines the history of political and legal scandals in the United States. Focuses primarily on scandals during the 20th and early 21st centuries, including Teapot Dome, Watergate, the “Keating Five,” Iran-Contra, Iraq-Gate, Clinton-Lewinsky, Enron, waterboarding and mistreatment of Iraq war prisoners, and the various Trump-related scandals. We explore theoretical approaches to scandal analysis, similarities and differences between the scandals, and future prospects in American politics.  

Zipperstein  
166R Undergraduate Research Seminar in 20th Century U.S. History

A undergraduate research seminar on US history designed to guide students in doing research. Each student will produce a substantial research paper on some aspect of American politics and/or culture since 1900.  

Adams  
167CB Capital and Class in 20th Century America

A survey of American workers from the turn of the century to the present period. Topics include workers and American socialism, the 1919 steel strike, the rise of the CIO, labor and the cold war, and deindustrialization and workers.  

Lichtenstein
171C The United States and the World, 1898-1945

Analysis of developments in foreign affairs in first half of twentieth century. Formation and execution of foreign policy; interaction between foreign and domestic affairs.

Yaqub  
172A Politics and Public Policy in the United States

The interaction of politics and public policy from the revolution to the present, focusing upon the key issues of each era in social, economic, cultural, racial, and other policy areas. A particular concern for the policy-making process, ideology, and the cultural origins of politics.  

Bergstrom  
173T American Environmental History

Traces the history of American attitudes and behavior toward nature. Focus on wilderness, the conservation movement, and modern forms of environmentalism.  

Adams  
174Q Capstone Seminar in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice

Capstone seminar for the Minor in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice. Students participate in structured discussion and in-depth reflection of the knowledge acquired through interdisciplinary coursework and internship experiences, to produce a final paper, series of essays or policy briefs, and/or other kinds of creative products in consultation with the course instructor. Students will present their work at a public symposium, providing an opportunity to hone their public speaking skills, while contributing to community understanding of how poverty and inequality can be addressed through purposive social research and action.  

Dunne  
184A History of China

Ancient China to 589ce.  

Barbieri  
185A Qing Empire

The Qing period saw the doubling of China’s territory, the enormous population growth, and the many encounters with the West. We will examine the politics, cultures, social norms, and different peoples, with a focus on the problem of modernization.  

Zheng  
185CQ Reading Seminar on the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-1976)

No understanding of contemporary China is possible without understanding the ramifications of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. This course seeks to consider the tumultuous episode as a field of historical research and conceptual inquiry. We create this class together.  

Zheng  
193MA The Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800

This course introduces students to the major topics, themes, and debates in early modern Atlantic history using the “Atlantic World” as a category of analysis. Atlantic history diverges from traditional imperial and state histories of the western hemisphere in recognizing that the Americas were shaped by all of the peoples of the Atlantic basin—not just Europeans but Africans and Native Americans as well. Accordingly, this course emphasizes the contacts, interchanges, and conflicts between the different groups that inhabited the Atlantic World, offering new insights into the cultural, social, political, and economic processes that transformed the early Americas between 1400 and 1800 and laid the groundwork for contemporary American society.  

Moore  
194BH Senior Honors Seminar

Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.

Bouley  
195IA Senior Thesis

A two-quarter individual research project, under the direction of a history professor selected with the advice of the departmental adviser to public policy students. 

Bergstrom  
196JA/JB/JC Internship in Scholarly Publishing

Through this year-long internship, students work under faculty direction to produce an issue of the UCSB History Department’s Undergraduate Journal. Students meet every two weeks and gain practical experience in scholarly publishing disseminating calls for papers, soliciting undergraduate contributions, locating peer reviewers, facilitating revisions with authors, and bibliographic and copywriting work. They also gain a working knowledge of the UCSB Library’s online publication platform, which will host the journal. Students utilize various digital humanities tools – podcasts, social media, and websites – to promote the undergraduate research being published in Journal as well as host an annual showcase of scholars’ work.  

Henderson  
200AS Historical Literature: Asia

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.  

McDonald  
200G Historical Literature – Women, Gender, and Sexuality

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduction to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.  

Henderson  
201C Advanced Historical Literature: Comparative

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces students to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.  

Ware  
201CB Advanced Historical Literature Middle Period China

A reading course in a field of Chinese History, 220 CE- 1571 CE. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.  

Zuo  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. E. Europe.  

Edgar  
201LA Advanced Historical Literature: Latin America

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. LA. Latin America.  

Laurent-Perrault  
201ME Advanced Historical Literature: Middle East

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. ME. Middle East. 

For Winter 2021: Advanced Historical Literature: Middle East

“Freedom and Unfreedom in the Modern Middle East”
This course focuses on histories of policing, imprisonment, and the quest for freedom  in the modern Middle East. It will explore historical experiences ranging from North Africa, to the Arabian Peninsula, the Eastern Mediterranean. We study spectra of freedom and unfreedom in experiences of bondage, slavery, labor, conscription, detention, and punishment. The course will focus on both the lived experiences and microhistories of (un)freedom as well as the institutions and structures that shaped these experiences (police, prisons, households, hospitals, and more.) 

Seikaly  
201OH Advanced Historical Literature: Oral History

Readings in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduction to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.  

Miescher  
209A The Academic Profession of History

This course provides students with the practical knowledge needed for obtaining an academic position, develops skills for effective teaching, and prepares students to deal with funding agencies, publishers, employers, and professional organizations.  

For Winter 2022: This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the academic field of history as a profession. We will discuss the state of graduate education, the job market, the experience of adjuncts and lecturers, diversity, equity, and inclusion, the variety of teaching jobs, peer review and getting published, careers outside academia, work/family balance, the current state of the humanities, and the changing face of the university.  

Chavez-Garcia  
210RA Race, Religion, and Revolution

How do human beings manage relations between the seen and unseen worlds? This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between spirituality and radical social change, especially—though not exclusively—among people of color. Visiting scholars and activists will workshop or present original research rooted in the humanities and social sciences and graduate students will read and respond to their work as they develop their own research questions. Short weekly reading responses and one 8-10 page paper are required each term. The goal is to foster collaborative interdisciplinary scholarship on the intersection of racial, religious, and revolutionary thought and practice, irrespective of period or place. 2-quarter course.  

Ware  
215B Seminar in Medieval History

As a group reading course over two quarters, the themes of the course involve reflecting on how your present or possible work or research fits into the historical study of the Middle Ages, the field of Medieval Studies, and history in general. It incorporates and welcomes other time periods and places. This widely encompassing course will help you in positioning your research and writing. In consultation with your advisor and the instructor, students will select their topics for the course – what you are presently doing for a dissertation or to start to formulate a possible dissertation topic. We will moreover be compiling individual bibliographies, discussing everyone’s sources, reflecting on possible theoretical aspects of your work, and doing translations in common as well as we can. We will read theoretical articles together that are to be suggested by the students. We will do a close reading of the texts brought forward by the individual student. Our work will be about your various research projects!  The instructor understands that the students will be at various levels of experience and stages of personal research. Among the specific themes we will emphasize are: Medieval World History, medievalism and ideology, how your research might be perceived by the modern world over time. We will also study in some detail  the influence of nationalism, racism, and colonialism on history study and our concepts. We will look at the state and role of the digital humanities for our projects. 

English  
223A Seminar in Modern European History

A research seminar in selected topics in the history of Europe, 1815 to the present.  

Marcuse  
277B Topics in the History of Science

Research seminar selected from such topics as Babylonian astronomy, Greek science, Age of Newton, rise of modern physics, scientific instruments, nationalism/internationalism in science, science and society, sociology of science, public conceptions of science, organization and profession of science.  

Aronova  
287J Reinventing “Japan” Colloquium

This year long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students who study Japanese history and culture. It introduces current scholarship on Japan via readings, discussions and presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars and graduate students. The colloquium meets bi- weekly. Students will prepare readings for discussion, write a seminar-length paper and present their paper to the colloquium once during the year.  

McDonald  
295GS Gender and Sexualities Colloquium

This year-long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students and UCSB scholars who study the histories of women, gender, or sexuality across time and space. It introduces students to current literature and contemporary debates through readings, discussion, and public presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars, and graduate students. Participants will meet every other week. Preparation might include coordinating readings for discussion, writing a chapter/article for peer review, or presenting original research to colloquium members.  

Starting in Fall 2021 there will be space set aside for senior History Undergraduates or those completing their LGBTQ Studies Minor in Feminist Studies in the Gender and Sexualities Workshop (HIST 295 GS). Though this 2 Credit Hour Course is designed for Graduate Students who study the histories of women, gender, or sexuality across time and space, its primary purpose is to introduce students to current literature and contemporary debates through readings, discussion, and public presentations by guest scholars. Participants will meet every other week and preparation might include coordinating readings for discussion or sharing their own original research with workshop members (among other things).  If you are interested or would like to know more, please contact Jarett Henderson at jhenderson@history.ucsb.edu. You will need an add code to enroll. 

Henderson  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.  

Bouley  
295PH Colloquium in Public History

A year-long professional colloquium on major topics and new work in Public History. Leading practitioners share theory and practice of the discipline in talks, workshops and occasional field visits. Relevant reading and writing assigned. Meets three to four times per quarter.  

F 1-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Bergstrom