# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2B World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1000 to 1700 CE.

Zuo  
2C World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1700 to present.

Marcuse  
4B Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Survey of the history of Europe in the Medieval and Early Modern periods, 800-1700. Discusses the major social, political, religious, and cultural characteristics and developments of the period, as well as key interactions between Europe and other parts of the world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.

Bouley  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills  

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

Chattopadhyaya
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills  

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

Majewski  
17B American Peoples

Sectional crisis through progressivism. A survey of the leading issues in american life from colonial times to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

Perrone  
22 History of Technology

As much as religion or politics, technology has played a central, yet often overlooked role, in the shaping of the modern world. This lower-division undergraduate course presents a social history of technology from roughly the 17th century to the early 21st century. This course is based around a framework of the individuals, issues, and ideas that shaped the development of different technologies and the ways these interacted with one another across time, space, and peoples. In studying this history, we do not accept technology uncritically. Rather, we learn how its use has acted as a powerful force in modern society.

McCray  
49B Survey of African History

1800 – 1945. History 49-A-B-C is a general survey course designed to introduce students to major themes in African history. The course focuses on African civilizations and identities, European colonial conquests, governance and colonial economies, African resistance and engagement with global capitalism. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during lecture.

Chikowero  
56 Intro Mexican History

An introduction to the basic issues and themes of Mexican history, from the pre-Hispanic era to the present.

Castillo-Muñoz  
80 Chinese Civilization

A survey of the history of Chinese civilization from 2,000 BCE to the present, focusing on the origins and later development of political, social, economic, philosophical, religious, and cultural traditions.

Zheng  
105II Infrastructure and Ideology

Explores the relationship between infrastructure and ideology in the modern world. From urban planning to Bitcoin, we will look at the ways that infrastructure serves as a foundation for social life and as a source of stories and conflicts about the social order. Analyzes infrastructure from a global perspective and draws on examples from France to Singapore. Specific topics to vary by quarter.

McDonald  
107C The Darwinian Revolution

Examines the social and scientific impacts of evolutionary ideas from around 1800 through Charles Darwin, the modern evolutionary synthesis, the birth of ecology, and molecular biology. Focus is on America and Western Europe.

Aronova  
107D Biology and Society

Examines how major biological concepts-from evolution to biotechnology-inspired the visions of humanity’s future, as well as the understanding of life and society.

Aronova  
115B Worlds of Renaissance Italy

Explores the overlapping worlds of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500: the vibrant merchant culture; the elegant courts of princes; intellectual circles like the Platonic Academy; famed mercenary captains and their troops; the underworld of male same sex relations, of criminality and prostitution; the lives of women in marriages, in convents and in poorhouses; the workshops and homes of the laboring poor. One central theme is the culture of patronage and the production of extraordinary art.

Lansing  
115R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Medieval European History

Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required.

Lansing  
117C Women, the family, and sexuality in the Middle Ages

Family structure; perceptions and ideals of intimate and familial relations; status, perceptions, and experiences of women in Western Europe c. 400-1400 A.D. Special attention on social, political, and religious contexts.

Blumenthal  
124C Sex, Gender, and Settler Colonialism

Examines how sex and gender legitimized the process of settler colonial rule across the globe. Students interrogate the ways that ideas about sex and gender privileged particular selves at the expense of others in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. Pays particular attention to the economic, political, and cultural structures of colonial rule that settlers established to remove and erase Indigenous peoples and histories. Also consider how those dispossessed, disenfranchised and discriminated against resisted settler-colonial rule into the twenty-first-century world.

Henderson  
149H Hip Hop History in Africa & the Diaspora
Ware  
151B Lat. Am His. 19th. Century
Nineteenth-century Latin America. Topics include: the independence movements, the consolidation of the new states, and the rise of export-oriented economies.
 
Méndez Gastelumendi  
151Q Readings in Lat Am. History

A weekly reading seminar on special topics in the history of Latin America. Depending on the topic, it may include primary sources and works of fiction. Written assignments required.

Laurent-Perrault  
151R Lat Am Research Seminar

A research seminar in Latin American history. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required.

Méndez Gastelumendi  
153M Tools for Healing from Global Race-Making  

This course explores and seeks to undo the severe impact the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and enslavement of African men, women, and children in the Americas did to collective perceptions about worth, dignity, gender, and race, in the Atlantic World and beyond. Through the reading of secondary sources, the Slavevoyages.org database, and primary sources, this course will cover aspects of the Atlantic World from the beginning of the sixteenth century, until the end of the nineteenth century. The course will guide everyone in a process of unpacking, reflecting, healing, and re-contextualizing the ways in which historical power dynamics have conditioned how we think of Blackness, Africa, its inhabitants, and people of African descent.  

Laurent-Perrault  
162R Research in US Antislavery

Research seminar in the history of U.S. antislavery movements from the Revolution to the present. Explores political, social, and cultural approaches.

Majewski  
166LB American Legal History

The history of the U.S. Supreme Court, legal thought, legal education and the legal profession since the late nineteenth century.

TBA
166R 20th Century Research Seminar

An undergraduate research seminar on US history designed to guide students in doing research. Each student will produce a substantial research paper on some aspect of American politics and/or culture since 1900.

Adams  
167CA History American Working Class

A survey of the origins an formation of the American working class from thecolonial period to the late nineteenth century. Topics include workers and community, the coming of the industrial order, the 1877 labor strike, and workers and the trade union movement.

Adams  
168CR Chicano History Seminar

Studies in selected aspects of Chicano history and the United States-Mexico borderlands with an emphasis on social and economic history.

Castillo-Muñoz  
168N Interracial Intimacy

Historical, sociological, and psychological exploration of several interconnecting phenomena, including interracial and interethnic romance and marriage, and changing identities and social positions of multiracial and multiethnic individuals. Concentrates mainly on the United States, with selected international comparisons.

Spickard  
171ME US & Middle East since 1900

Analysis of developments in US involvement in the Middle East since 1900. Formation and execution of US foreign policy toward the region: interaction between US foreign and domestic affairs; perceptions and actions of nations and peoples of the Middle East.

Yaqub  
174Q Capstone Seminar in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice

Capstone seminar for the Minor in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice. Students participate in structured discussion and in-depth reflection of the knowledge acquired through interdisciplinary coursework and internship experiences, to produce a final paper, series of essays or policy briefs, and/or other kinds of creative products in consultation with the course instructor. Students will present their work at a public symposium, providing an opportunity to hone their public speaking skills, while contributing to community understanding of how poverty and inequality can be addressed through purposive social research and action.

TBA
175D American Family History

Examines how race, ethnicity, and class have shaped changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, child rearing, work patterns, and relationships among men, women, and children. Also explores changing conceptions of the state’s role in family life.

Jacobson  
178B American Urban History

A study of the political, economic, social, and intellectual impact of the city upon American history, and the impact of history upon the growth of American urbanization.  

O'Connor  
184A History of China to 589
Ancient China to 589ce.
Barbieri  
187A Tokugawa Japan

A survey of Japanese social and cultural history from the mid-sixteenth century to the nineteenth century.

Roberts  
193F Food in World History

Explores the cultural, economic, and geopolitical roles of food and drink in world history. Topics include: trade, production, and consumption; global food chains; morality and food reform; identities and body image; scarcity, food scares, and food security.

Rappaport  
194BH Senior Honors Seminar
A 2-quarter in-progress sequence course with grades for both quarters issued upon completion of History 194BH. All 8 of the units for the course sequence may be applied toward the major.
Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.
Blumenthal  
195IA HPPL Senior Thesis
Students should enroll by instructor number. 8 units of credit will be awarded at the end of two quarters assigned for the thesis. A two-quarter in-progress sequence course with grades for both quarters.
A two-quarter individual research project, under the direction of a history professor selected with the advice of the departmental adviser to public policy students.
David Stein
196SJ  Internship in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice
This course fulfills a requirement for the Minor in Poverty, Inequality, and Social Justice. Must be taken for a letter grade.
Students gain practical experience by working in organizations or initiatives engaged in addressing poverty and inequality through policy analysis, advocacy, direct social provision, community action, and/or political organizing. Opportunities to cultivate problem-solving, communication, organizational, and interpersonal skills needed to work effectively in institutional or collectively organized settings and to gain exposure to professional, post-graduate educational and training, and related career opportunities in anti-poverty and social justice fields. Students work under faculty supervision to produce reports, a research paper, or other types of creative material based on their experiences.
TBA
196JB Journalism Internship

Through this year-long internship, students work under faculty direction to produce an issue of the UCSB History Department’s Undergraduate Journal. Students meet every two weeks and gain practical experience in scholarly publishing disseminating calls for papers, soliciting undergraduate contributions, locating peer reviewers, facilitating revisions with authors, and bibliographic and copywriting work. Students also gain a working knowledge of the UCSB Library’s online publication platform, which hosts the journal. Students utilize various digital humanities tools – podcasts, social media, websites – to promote the undergraduate research being published in Journal as well as host an annual showcase of scholars’ work.

Henderson  
201AM Adv Historical Lit: U.S.

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. AM. America.

O'Connor  
201C Comparative Colonialism

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces students to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.

Chikowero  
201E Adv. Historical Lit. Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. E. Europe.

Lee  
201E Latin Paleography

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. E. Europe.

English  
201RE Adv Hist Lit., Race/Ethnicity
A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. RE. Race and Ethnicity
Spickard  
201HT Adv Hist Lit. History of Technology
Intensive study of specific problems in the history of science. Topics vary from year to year, and students may therefore repeat the course for credit.
McCray  
202 Historical Methods
Normally required of all entering M.A. candidates other than those in public history. Open to other students on a space available basis. Offered every fall quarter.
A general introduction to selected historiographical issues and historical methods.
Miescher  
210RA Race, Faith, Revolution

How do human beings manage relations between the seen and unseen worlds? This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between spirituality and radical social change, especially? though not exclusively?among people of color. Visiting scholars and activists workshop or present original research rooted in the humanities and social sciences and graduate students read and respond to their work as they develop their own research questions. The goal is to foster collaborative interdisciplinary scholarship on the intersection of racial, religious, and revolutionary thought and practice, irrespective of period or place Workload entails short bi-weekly reading responses; no term paper required. 2-quarter course.

Ware  
223A Seminar in Modern Europe History
A research seminar in selected topics in the history of Europe, 1815 to the present. A two-quarter in-progress sequence course with grades for both quarters issued upon completion of History 223B.
Edgar  
250A Foundations in Lat Am. Hist- Colonial

Seminar introduces the important issues, themes, and literature in Latin American history during the pre- Columbian and colonial periods.

Cobo Betancourt  
266A Seminar in Recent US Hist

Research seminar in recent U.S. history. A research seminar for graduate students interested in any aspect of recent U.S. history.

Chavez-Garcia  
287J  Reinventing “Japan” Colloquium

This year long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students who study Japanese history and culture. It introduces current scholarship on Japan via readings, discussions and presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars and graduate students. The colloquium meets bi- weekly. Students will prepare readings for discussion, write a seminar-length paper and present their paper to the colloquium once during the year.

McDonald  
289B Seminar in Chinese History

A research seminar on selected problems in Chinese history. Some working knowledge of the Chinese language desirable but not necessary.

Zheng  
292B Foundations of U.S. History, 1846 to 1917

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes and literature in the history of the United States, from 1846 to 1917. Historiographical in nature the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

Jacobson  
294 Work, Labor, and Political Economy

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

Covo  
295GS Gender and Sexuality Workshop

This year-long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students and UCSB scholars who study the histories of women, gender, or sexuality across time and space. It introduces students to current literature and contemporary debates through readings, discussion, and public presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars, and graduate students. Participants will meet every other week. Preparation might include coordinating readings for discussion, writing a chapter/article for peer review, or presenting original research to colloquium members.

Henderson  
295TS Worskshop in Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

Bouley