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June 2020

History Department Graduation

June 14, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom, CA

Join the History Department in a virtual celebration of graduating undergraduates and graduates! Use this Zoom link to join: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/98074114836

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September 2020

Free

Stuart Tyson Smith, “Black Pharaohs? Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations”

September 22, 2020 @ 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Harvard University Fall 2020 W.E.B. Du Bois Virtual Lecture Series "Black Pharaohs?: Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations" on 9/22/20 at 4PM ET

Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African & African American Research welcomes UCSB Professor of Anthropology (and History Department affiliate faculty member) Stuart Tyson Smith to the W.E.B. Du Bois Virtual Lecture Series. On Tuesday, September 22 Professor Smith will present his Zoom lecture “Black Pharaohs? Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations.” Register in advance for this free event here. Please note that the lecture begins at 4:00 Eastern/1:00 Pacific time. Professor Smith’s research centers on the civilizations…

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October 2020

Free

John Majewski, Living Democracy in Capitalism’s Shadow: Creative Labor, Black Abolitionists, and the Struggle to End Slavery

October 8, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Black and white drawing of a woman with bonnet thinking about what to write with a quill in her hand

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link In the two decades before the Civil War, a new type of capitalism developed in the northern United States that stressed mass education, widespread innovation, and new markets for art and design. For Black abolitionists, the changing northern economy presented new opportunities to highlight the evils of slavery. While continuing to attack slavery’s physical cruelty, Black abolitionists in the 1840s and 1850s increasingly highlighted the “mental darkness”…

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Sarah Case, “The Woman Suffrage Movement: ‘A Century of Struggle'”

October 17, 2020 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom Talk for "The Woman Suggrage Movement: 'A Century of Struggle'" on 10/1721 at 4PM

Join UCSB History Associates on Saturday, October 17 on Zoom for their first public lecture of the academic year. Dr. Sarah Case will survey the woman suffrage movement for the hundred years or so before the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. Her talk will consider why the idea of women voting was so controversial in the nineteenth century, and examine how it became less so in the early twentieth century. Dr. Case will introduce some of the major activists…

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Free

Lizabeth Cohen, Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited

October 22, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Struggling to Save America's Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited on 10/22 from 4-5PM

Click here to download the flyer for this event. REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities—in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the…

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November 2020

Free

Public History Colloquium Event–“In the Spaciousness of Uncertainty is Room to Act”: Public History’s Long Game

November 6, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History this Friday, November 6 at noon for a Zoom talk by Professor Marla Miller (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) about her recent article in The Public Historian, “‘In the Spaciousness of Uncertainty is Room to Act’: Public History’s Long Game.” Taking her title from Rebecca Solnit’s Hope in the Dark, an exploration of the long arc of historical change, Miller engages with students and the public around the ideas, questions and new directions…

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Free

Azaria Mbughuni, “Tanzania and the Liberation Struggles in Southern Africa”

November 12, 2020 @ 11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom Talk for "Tanzania and the Liberation Struggles in Southern Africa" with Dr. Azaria Mbughuni on 11/12/20 from 11:30-12:30PM

All are cordially invited to a special guest lecture by Dr. Azaria Mbughuni on the role of Tanzania in Southern Africa’s liberation struggles. Dr. Mbughuni’s guest lecture will build onto Professor Mhoze Chikowero‘s ongoing graduate seminar on African Self-Liberation. Dr. Mbughuni is Assistant Professor of History at Lane College, where he is also the Chair of the Division of Business, Social and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Mbughuni was born in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He earned his Ph.D. from Howard University. His research…

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Free

Kendall Lovely, “Dismembering Classicism: Contesting Colonial and Classical Legacies in the Southwest”

November 12, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA

Classicization in U.S. heritage narratives often involves the imposition of classical elements, derived from Greek and Roman civilization, onto narratives of colonial conquest in Southwestern borderlands and frontier spaces. Ongoing controversies surrounding statues of the conquistador, Juan de Oñate, reflect the ways in which the classical legacy remains prominent in public spheres of historical narrative. In providing a visual narrative of conquest linked to classical imagery, the Spanish history of the settling of the Southwest becomes implicated in broader U.S.…

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Free

Sheila Lodge, “Santa Barbara: An UNcommonplace American Town”

November 15, 2020 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom Talk "Santa Barbara: An Uncommonplace American Town" on 11/15/20 at 4PM

UCSB History Associates has partnered with the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation to present a public lecture by former mayor Sheila Lodge on the topic of Santa Barbara history.  Lodge will discuss her book Santa Barbara: An UNcommonplace American Town about how Santa Barbara became the community that it is through planning. She will describe the many battles it sometimes took and the process that was developed to make the critical decisions. Because of her personal involvement in the struggles,…

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December 2020

Free

Public History Colloquium Event–”Pride of Place: LGBTQ Public History in the United Kingdom”

December 4, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
LQBTQ protest in the UK

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, December 4 at noon for a Zoom talk by UCSB alumnus Dr. Justin Bengry (Goldsmiths, University of London). Dr. Bengry will present a major crowdsourced public history project he helped develop. Pride of Place maps sites of LGBTQ history in the United Kingdom. Dr. Bengry set the project in context of the state of LGBTQ public history in the UK. He is a historian of sexuality and capitalism who chairs the…

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Free

Nyasha Mboti, “Closing the Loophole: Apartheid Studies”

December 10, 2020 @ 9:30 am
Zoom, CA
FLyer for Zoom Talk for "Closing the Loophole" on 12/10/20 at 9:30AM

Professor Mhoze Chikowero invites all to attend a special guest lecture by Dr. Nyashi Mboti as part of UCSB’s African Studies Series. Dr. Mboti will discuss the new field he founded: Apartheid Studies. He will introduce his forthcoming 4-volume treatise on the subject, Apartheid Studies: A Manifesto, which will change how we think about enslavement, colonialism, neocolonialism, impoverishment, and the exploitation and carnage of humans that has defined global history for at least half a millennium.   Dr. Mboti is an Associate…

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January 2021

Free

Miroslava Chávez-García, “Migrant Longing”

January 10 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Migrant Longing: Letter Writing Across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands by Miroslava Chávez García book cover with flyer for Zoom Webinar with the author on 1/10/21 at 4PM

UCSB History Associates has partnered with the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation to present a public lecture by UCSB Professor of History Miroslava Chávez-García.  Drawing upon a personal collection of more than 300 letters exchanged between her parents and other family members across the U.S.-Mexico border, Professor Chávez-García recreates and gives meaning to the hope, fear, and longing migrants experienced in their everyday lives both “here” and “there” (aqui y alla). As private sources of communication hidden from public consumption and historical…

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Job Talk: Taylor M. Moore’s “Amulet Tales: Political and Spiritual Economies of Healing in Egypt”

January 13 @ 11:30 am
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk "Amulet Tales: Political and Spiritual Economies of Healing in Egypt on 1/13/21 at 11:30AM

The History Department invites all to a job talk by Dr. Taylor M. Moore on January 13, 2021. Dr. Moore is a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the History Department at UC Santa Barbara. Her research lies at the intersections of critical race studies, decolonial/postcolonial histories of science, and decolonial materiality studies with a geographical focus on Egypt and the late Ottoman world. Her manuscript-in-preparation, Superstitious Women: Race, Magic, and Medicine in Egypt, uses modern Egyptian amulets as…

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Free

Public History Colloquium Event–”Public Lands, Public History: Putting History to Work for the United States Forest Service”

January 15 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for USDA Forest Service History, 1960-2020

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, January 15 at noon for a Zoom talk by Leisl Carr Childers and Michael Childers (Colorado State University). Childers and Carr Childers will discuss their current project, a new history of the USDA Forest Service from 1960-2020, and the historical methodologies that undergird their work. In particular, they will address what it means to work in applied history, how applied history works (or does not work) with regard to public…

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February 2021

Free

Mia Dragnic and Pierina Ferretti: “An Expansive Rebellion: Feminism and Social Revolt in Chile”

February 1 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for An Expansive Rebellion: Feminism and Social Revolt in Chile on 2/1/21 at 4PM

UCSB and UCSD have joined together to welcome Pierina Ferretti and Mia Dragnic García, sociologists and doctoral candidates in Latin American Studies at the University of Chile. In October 2019, Chile experienced its largest social revolt since the return to democracy in 1990. The mobilization, which began as a spontaneous reaction to protest against a 0.30 USD rise in the Santiago transport fare, soon after became a widespread outburst against the precarious and unjust conditions that affect the majority of…

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Free

LAIS Tertulia | “Race and Caste in Latin America, India, and the USA: A Global Conversation”

February 2 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Race and Caste in Latin America, India, and the USA: A Global Conversation on 2/2/21 from 12-1:30PM

Latin American and Iberian Studies invites you to a Tertulia in the Time of COVID, 2020-2021! Two History Department faculty members will speak at this exciting event. In her widely acclaimed book Caste: The Origins of our Discontents, Isabel Wilkerson complicates the category of race, as it is commonly understood in the US, by bringing caste to the fore. She discusses the “caste” historical experience of the US in light of those in Nazi Germany and India. Insofar as the…

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Free

Public History Colloquium Event–”Reinterpreting Slavery and the Emotional Labor of History”

February 5 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Women in front of a The Little Round House sign with caption "Author discussing the Little Round House marker on a February 2020 Hallowed Grounds tour. (Photo by author)"

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, February 5 at noon for a Zoom talk by Professor Hilary N. Green (University of Alabama). Professor Green reflects on the powerful legacy of Jim Crow era efforts to erase the history of slavery from the landscape of her workplace, the University of Alabama, and shares a project she pursued to rewrite this historical narrative. She researched, designed and implemented a campus tour to tell the actual history of slavery and…

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Free

Lucía Cavallero: “Gendered Violence and Financialization of Social Reproduction: A Feminist Perspective On Debt”

February 8 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Gendered Violence and Financialization of Social Reproduction: A Feminist Perspective on Debt on 2/8/21 at 4PM

UCSB and UCSD have joined together to welcome Lucía Cavallero, a doctoral candidate in Social Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires. The presentation will focus on the relationship between sexist violence and economic violence, specifically the financialization of life and the increase in gender-based violence. It will highlight the Latin American feminist movement’s struggles against debt as articulated in the tactic of the March 8 International Women’s Day Strike and in Argentina’s Ni Una Menos (Not One Less) movement.…

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Jason Young, “Look for Me in the Whirlwind: Toward an Ecology of Afro-Futurism”

February 9 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Look for Me in the Whirlwind: Toward an Ecology of Afro-Futurism on 2/9/21 at 4PM

Speaking before a rapt audience, famed black nationalist leader, Marcus Garvey, vowed to support the cause of African liberation not only in life, but also in death, insisting that he would return as an “earthquake, or a cyclone, or plague, or pestilence” to aid in the fight for freedom. He implored his followers: “Look for me in the whirlwind.” Using Garvey’s promise as a starting point, Dr. Jason Young (University of Michigan) reconsiders the history of slavery with an eye…

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Free

Capps Center Event: Speech, White Supremacy, and Insurrection

February 9 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk: Speech, White Supremacy, & Insurrection on 2/9/21 from 6-7:30PM

The January 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol brought to the fore the threat that white nationalist forces pose to our democracy. Join the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion, and Public Life for a conversation about these forces, their history, and what can be done to resist them. Our guests will be UC Free Speech Fellows Ryan Coonerty (Santa Cruz County Supervisor) and Melissa Barthelemy (Public History doctoral candidate), and Dr. Katya Armistead (Assistant…

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar I: Sovereignty and the Political

February 19 @ 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Focal Point book: Herman Bennett, African Kings and Black Slaves: Sovereignty and Dispossession in the Early Modern Atlantic on 2/19/21 at 1PM

The History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the inaugural session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within it, the series brings together UCSB History faculty and graduate students who have volunteered to lead a dialogue on Black life, race, and antiblackness in history. The conversations will engage Herman Bennett’s African Kings…

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Free

Adrienne Edgar, “Mixed Children in Soviet Central Asia: Dilemmas of Identity and Belonging”

February 25 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Identity Politics Workshop: "Mixed Children in Soviet Central Asia: Dilemmas of Identity and Belonging" on 2/25/21 from 12:30 to 2PM

The UCSB Department of Political Science‘s Identity Politics Group invites you to join them at a Workshop in which Professor Adrienne Edgar (History, UCSB) will present a chapter from her forthcoming book, Intimate Internationalism: Mixed Marriage in Soviet Central Asia. The chapter to be discussed is “Mixed Children in Soviet Central Asia: Dilemmas of Identity and Belonging.” Professor Paul Spickard (History, UCSB) will serve as the discussant. To obtain a copy of Professor Edgar’s chapter in advance, email Kristen Thomas-McGill…

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Free

AfroLatinx Voices Series: Re-Writing Black Religions in the Atlantic World–A Conversation with Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

February 25 @ 12:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for AfroLatinX Voices Series: Re-writing Black Religions in the Atlantic World, A conversation on 2/25/21 at 12:30PM

How might we re-write the history and historiography of religion, race, and art in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world? Prof. Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco) will discuss the role of historians in uncovering and debating ideas about the past of people of African descent during the colonial period. She invites us to consider the ways art, material culture and performance can help us understand how people lived and experienced different forms of religiosity in the past, and…

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Free

Mónica Michelena: “We Are Charrúa Women: From Negation to Re-Existence in Our Body-Territory”

February 26 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for We are Charrua Women: From Negation to Re-Existence in Our Body-Territory on 2/26/21 at 4PM

UCSB and UCSD have joined together to welcome Mónica Michelena, Secretary of the Charrúa Nation’s Council and former Advisor on Indigenous Affairs for Uruguay’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2014-18). Charrúa women have gone through dispossession, exclusion, and negation that left marks on their collective memory and body-territory. This genocidal process did not end in 19th-century Uruguay, but continues today and manifests itself every time that institutions or civil society denies their existence as an indigenous people. For fifteen years, together…

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Free

CWWG Workshop–Addison Jensen, “WITCHIEs, Chickies, and Donut Dollies: The Women’s Rights Movement and American GIs”

February 27 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
6 people in camoflauge uniform wading in a river. UCSB Cold War Working Group

On Saturday, February 27, from 2 to 4 pm, the Center for Cold War Studies and International History (CCWS) will host a workshop. They will read and discuss a dissertation chapter, “WITCHIEs, Chickies, and Donut Dollies: The Women’s Rights Movement and American GIs,” by Addie Jensen, a doctoral candidate in the UCSB history department. This workshop is part of a new CCWS initiative, the Cold War Working Group (CWWG), a collaborative, graduate student-led group designed to provide a supportive, welcoming…

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March 2021

Free

Launch Party for the UCSB Undergraduate Journal of History

March 2 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
The Undergraduate Journal of History Vol. 1, No.1 Spring 2021

The UCSB Undergraduate Journal of History is about to release its first issue, and its editors and contributors cordially invite the public to its Zoom launch party on March 2. The event will feature a short Q&A featuring four of the ten undergraduate authors and moderated by members of the editorial team.    To celebrate the Journal‘s launch, use this Zoom link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/86005899456

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Free

Humanities Decanted–W. Patrick McCray, “Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture”

March 4 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Text of Humanities Decanted with wine being poured into a vase. Book cover of Making Art Work by W. Patrick McCray

The IHC‘s Humanities Decanted series invites all to a dialogue between Patrick McCray (History) and Alan Liu (English) about McCray’s new book, Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture (MIT Press, 2020). Audience Q&A will follow. Despite C. P. Snow’s warning, in 1959, of an unbridgeable chasm between the humanities and the sciences, engineers and scientists of that era enthusiastically collaborated with artists to create visually and sonically interesting multimedia works. This new…

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Free

Public History Colloquium Event–”Abina and the Important Men: Graphic History as Public History”

March 5 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer fro Abina and the Important Men: Graphic History as Public History on 3/5/21 at 12PM

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, March 5 at noon for a Zoom talk by Trevor R. Getz (San Francisco State University). Abina and the Important Men began as an attempt to address a classroom problem: how to teach students about the dual responsibilities of the historian to historical subjects and contemporary audiences.  These goals both drove its development as a graphic history.  Fortuitously, its publication caught the leading edge of the rehabilitation of that medium as a…

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Free

History Associates: Luke Roberts, “A Samurai Wife Divorces her Lout of a Husband”

March 6 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Luke Roberts on a bicycle in front of a field and a building

Join the History Associates for an engaging presentation from UCSB History Professor Luke Roberts on a specific case that influenced gender roles in 19th-century Japan. Zoom link: ucsb.zoom.us/j/6855143149 Mori Nao, a young samurai wife in Japan, desired a divorce from her abusive husband in 1824. Legally a man could divorce his wife but a wife could not divorce her husband. Nevertheless, she persisted in the face of his adamant refusal to divorce her. Soon her relatives mobilized their social networks…

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Samiha Rahman, “Redefining Black Excellence: Ihsan, Islamic Education, and the Tijani Sufi Order”

March 9 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Redefining Black Excellence: Ihsan, Islamic Education, and the Tikani Sufi Order on3/9/21 at 4PM

Since the 1980s, hundreds of predominantly working-class African American Muslim youth have migrated to the West African Tijani Sufi town of Medina Baye, Senegal. They hope to circumvent the antiblackness, Islamophobia, and economic inequality they face in the U.S. in search of a transformative educational encounter in a society where Blackness and Islam constitute the dominant norms. This talk chronicles these young people’s everyday experiences pursuing Islamic education in Medina Baye. Complicating popular notions that link Black excellence to individualistic…

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Free

IHC Talk: Utathya Chattopadhyaya, “Cannabis and South Asia”

March 9 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Cannabis and South Asia by Utathya Chattopadhyaya on 3/9/21 from 4-6PM

The IHC‘s Asian/American Studies Collective welcomes UCSB History professor Utathya Chattopadhyaya for a talk on the role of cannabis in South Asian experiences of empire. Historical scholarship now conceives empire as a webbed uneven field of power relations and a multispecies enterprise. In other words, the anxious and breathless struggle of European imperialism to sustain itself subjected human, plant, animal, and insect bodies to its ambition to govern through logics of colonial difference. This paper argues that the cannabis plant in…

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar II: Empire and Liberation

March 12 @ 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Focal Point: Herman Bennett, African Kings and Black Slaves: Sovereignty and Dispossession in the Early Modern Atlantic on 3/12/21 at 1PM

Building on the collective knowledge shared in our first webinar, the History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the second session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within it, the series brings together UCSB History faculty and graduate students who have volunteered to lead a dialogue on Black life, race, and…

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8th Annual Van Gelderen Lecture: Sasha Coles, “The Great Silk Experiment: Silkworms, Mulberry Trees, and Women Workers in Mormon Country, 1850s-1910s”

March 14 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
A black-and-white image of a group of women gathered around a pile of foliage.

UCSB History Associates presents the eighth annual Van Gelderen Graduate Student Lecture, this year given by Dr. Sasha Coles. From the 1850s to the early 1900s, Latter-Day Saint (or Mormon) women in both rural and urban Great Basin settlements planted mulberry trees, raised silkworms, and attempted to produce silk cocoons, thread, and cloth of a high-enough quality to use and sell. By most measurements, they failed. Homegrown silk was time-consuming, onerous, and practically impossible to profit from, primarily due to…

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April 2021

ISRRAR Event–Dr. Maytha Alhassen, “The Ummic Imperative: A Decolonial Approach to Malcolm X’s Islam”

April 6 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for The Ummic Imperative: A Decolonial Approach to Malcom X's Islam on 4/6/21 at 4PM

Through an assemblage of multiple archives, Dr. Maytha Alhassen tracks the Malcolm X’s political and spiritual project the last year of his life as he travels across decolonizing geographies. Alhassen contends that undergirding Malcolm X’s Black liberation framework is a praxical commitment to an “ummic imperative.” Engaging Malcolm’s spiritual political philosophies will also serve to interrogate and complicate Third World movement politics. Join this Zoom event at tinyurl.com/isrrarTalk This event is part of the ISRRAR Spring Quarter series.

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Free

Public History Colloquium Event–“Presenting the Medieval Mediterranean: Museums and Archaeology in National Discourse”

April 9 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Presenting the Medieval MediterraneanL Museum and Archaeology in National Discourse on 4/9/21 at 12PM

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, April 9 at noon for a Zoom talk by William Tronzo (History of Art, UC San Diego). From time immemorial, material artifacts have played an important role in political discourse: think simply of the use of the crown (in the United Kingdom) or the throne (for example, the throne of St. Peter in the Roman Catholic Church) in the process of national or institutional self-identification. Over the course of several years,…

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar III: Racial Capitalism and Liberalism

April 16 @ 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Focal Point Dialogues in History: Conversations featuring faculty and graduate students on Black life, race, and antiblackness in history on 4/16/21 at 1PM

Building on the collective knowledge shared in the two previous webinars, the History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the third and final session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within it, the series brings together UCSB History faculty and graduate students who have volunteered to lead a dialogue on Black…

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Vincent Brown, “Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War”

April 20 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom lecture for Tacky's Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War on 4/20/21 at 4PM

Warfare migrates. This has never been more apparent than in the era when the violence of imperial expansion and enslavement transformed Europe, Africa, and the Americas, as they interacted across the Atlantic Ocean. European imperial conflicts extended the dominion of capitalist agriculture. African battles fed captives to the transatlantic trade in slaves. Masters and their human property struggled with one another continuously. These clashes amounted to a borderless slave war: war to enslave, war to expand slavery, and war against slaves,…

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CWWG Workshop–Mattie Webb, “Beyond Desegregation: Waging a Battle Against Apartheid in the South African Workplace”

April 24 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Mattie Webb in front of Cape Point South Africa sign

On Saturday, April 24, from 2 to 4 pm, the Center for Cold War Studies and International History (CCWS) will host a workshop. They will read and discuss a dissertation chapter, “Beyond Desegregation: Waging a Battle Against Apartheid in the South African Workplace,” by Mattie Webb, a doctoral candidate in the UCSB history department. This workshop is part of a new CCWS initiative, the Cold War Working Group (CWWG), a collaborative, graduate student-led group designed to provide a supportive, welcoming environment…

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History Beyond the Academy: A Conversation

April 24 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
FLyer for Zoom talk for History Beyond the Academy: A Conversation on 4/24/21 at 4PM

Come and join us for a panel discussion with recent graduates from UCSB’s Department of History (Mariel Aquino, Doug Genens, Caitlin Rathe, and Stephanie Seketa) to learn about their experiences working as historians beyond the Academy. Learn about work in academic administration, the non-profit sector and how to research and produce podcasts. The discussion will be moderated by current graduate students Addie Jensen and Mattie Webb. All are welcome! Join this event on Zoom at https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/6855143149. Click here to download…

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Free

History Associates: Patrick McCray, “Making Art Work: Artists and Engineers in the Age of Apollo”

April 25 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
6 adults in front of a system of light bulbs

Join the History Associates this Sunday for an engaging presentation from UCSB History Professor Patrick McCray. Artwork as opposed to experiment? Engineer versus artist? We often see two different cultural realms separated by impervious walls. But some fifty years ago, the borders between technology and art began to be breached. In this talk UCSB history professor (and former engineer) W. Patrick McCray shows how in this era, artists eagerly collaborated with engineers and scientists to explore new technologies and create…

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Interdisciplinary Conference on “Fallout: Chernobyl and the Ecology of Disaster”

April 29 - April 30
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Virtual Conference for Fallout: Chernobyl and the Ecology of Disaster on 4/29/21 from 4PM-5PM

The interdisciplinary virtual conference Fallout: Chernobyl and the Ecology of Disaster will take place on Friday, April 30, 2021 at 9:00am-4:00pm (Pacific Time, US & Canada), when an international slate of speakers representing a variety of disciplines will share their insights on the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster.    The day before, an associated Carsey-Wolf Center virtual discussion of the award-winning documentary “The Babushkas of Chernobyl,” with Director Holly Morris, will take place on Thursday, April 29, 2021 at 4:00pm (Pacific Time,…

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May 2021

ISRRAR Event–Dr. Sylvester Ogbechie, “Godbearer: Yoruba Orisa, Black Atlantic Modernisms and Afrofuturist Imaginaries”

May 4 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk with Dr. Sylvester Ogbechie "Godbearer: Yoruba Orisa, Black Atlantic Modernisms and Afrofuturist imaginaries

Dr. Sylvester Ogbechie‘s work evaluates the resurgence of African gods in Black Atlantic modernisms, contemporary media and Afrofuturist visualities. African deities are everywhere in contemporary culture from the Akan trickster god Anansi and numerous Yoruba Orisa in the American Gods TV series, through images of the Kh’Met (Egyptian) goddess Bast in the Afrofuturist blockbuster movie Black Panther, to the cyberspace narratives of William Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy that centered the Loa (gods) of the Haitian Vodun pantheon as primary characters. This…

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Free

Nicole Archambeau, “War, Plague & Confession: Stories of Survival from Fourteenth-Century Provence”

May 6 @ 4:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for zoom talk for "War, Plague & Confession: Stories of Survival from Fourteenth-Century Provence" on 5/6/21 at 4PM

The History Department is proud to welcome back alumna Dr. Nicole Archambeau (History, Colorado State University) for a virtual talk based on her new book Souls under Siege: Stories of War, Plague, and Confession in Fourteenth-Century Provence. You can read a glowing review of Souls under Siege in the Los Angeles Review of Books. Dr. Archambeau’s book and talk draw on a rich evidentiary base of 68 narrative testimonials from the canonization inquest for Countess Delphine de Puimichel, which was held…

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Free

Public History Colloquium Event–”The Queerness of Home: Public History and the Domestic Archive”

May 7 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for The Queerness of Home: Public History and the Domestic Archive on 5/7/21 at 12PM

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, May 7 at noon for a Zoom talk by Stephen Vider (History, Cornell University). Histories of queer and trans politics and culture have centered almost exclusively on public activism and spaces. Stephen Vider will discuss how his forthcoming book, The Queerness of Home: Gender, Sexuality, and the Politics of Domesticity After World War II (University of Chicago Press, October 2021) retells LGBT history from the inside out, revealing how LGBT people mobilized home spaces as crucial…

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Free

Lily Anne Welty Tamai, “Mixed-Race Black Identities in Postwar Japan and Okinawa”

May 19 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Mixed Race Black Identities in Post-War Japan and Okinawa on 5/19/21 for 4PM to 5:30PM

The East Asia Center welcomes UCSB History alumna Dr. Lily Anne Welty Tamai (Asian American Studies, UCLA) for a talk on “Mixed-Race Black Identities in Postwar Japan and Okinawa.” Mixed-race people born at the end of World War II made history quietly with their families and their communities. Wars and the military occupations that followed, coupled with increased migration across the Pacific, created a surge of interracial relationships, resulting in a mid-century multiracial baby boom. Easily identifiable by their mixed-race…

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Free

Center for Cold War Studies Talk: Nancy Mitchell, “Andrew Young: Challenging Anglo-Saxon Foreign Policy?”

May 20 @ 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for The Center of Cold War Studies & International History by Dr. Nancy Mitchel - Andrew Young: Challenging Anglo-Saxon Foreign Policy on 5/20/21 from 11AM to 12:15PM PDT

Andrew Young, one of Martin Luther King’s top aides and a former member of Congress, served as Jimmy Carter’s ambassador to the United Nations. Outspoken and controversial, Young questioned prevailing Cold War assumptions. “Communism has never been a threat to me,” he said. “Racism has always been a threat—and that has been the enemy of all of my life.” Nancy Mitchell is Professor of History at North Carolina State University. She is the author of Jimmy Carter in Africa: Race and the Cold War (2016),…

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Conference on “Imperial Foodways: Culinary Economies and Provisioning Politics”

May 21 - May 23
Zoom, CA
Flyer for virtual conference for Imperial Foodways: Culinary Economics and Provisioning Politics on 5/21-23/21

Registration is now open for the virtual conference “Imperial Foodways: Culinary Economies and Provisioning Politics.”  The full program, with panel and paper titles, can be viewed here. To Register, please click here. Because papers are pre-circulated, organizers Elizabeth Schmidt and Erika Rappaport ask attendees to indicate which panels they plan to attend on the registration form. Once you complete the registration, a conference organizer will be in touch with links to the relevant papers. Please be advised that the format of this conference…

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Keynote Lecture with Prof. Herman Bennett: “Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic”

May 21 @ 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Dialogues in History Keynote Lecture - Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic by Prof. Herman L. Bennett

The History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the keynote lecture of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series. The lecture, “Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic,” will be delivered by Prof. Herman L. Bennett. Herman L. Bennett is Professor at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. A scholar of Latin American history and the African Diaspora, Prof. Bennett’s previous books include Africans in Colonial Mexico: Absolutism, Christianity, and Afro-Creole…

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Senior Honors Thesis Colloquium

May 28 @ 9:00 am - 3:30 pm
Zoom, CA

The participants of the 2020-2021 Senior Honors Thesis Seminar will be holding a Zoom colloquium to showcase their research on Friday, May 28th. We encourage you to attend and show support for your fellow undergraduate history majors. This is also a great opportunity to get a feel for what the colloquium is like if you plan to participate in the honors thesis seminar in the future! The schedule of presentations and zoom link are attached. program.seniorhonorseminarcolloquium.2021

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A Conversation on Early Modern Print Culture: Hilary Bernstein and Patricia Fumerton Present Their New Books

May 28 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for A Conversation on Early Print Culture

Hilary Bernstein and Patricia Fumerton will each provide short introductions to their new books, followed by a conversation between the authors and then with the audience. Hilary Bernstein, Associate Professor of History, specializes in early modern France, with a particular focus on the history, culture, and politics of provincial towns in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Her new book is entitled Historical Communities: Cities, Erudition, and National Identity in Early Modern France. Professor Bernstein will be introduced by Professor Erika Rappaport. Patricia Fumerton…

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June 2021

Free

UCSB Africa Center Inaugural Lecture: Dr. Zoé Samudzi’s “Rewriting the Concentration Camp”

June 4 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom Lecture Rewriting the Concentration Camp by UCSB Africa Center: Inaugural Lecture on 6/4/21 at 11AM-1PM PST

The UCSB Africa Center cordially invites you to a special guest lecture on June 4 by Dr. Zoé Samudzi on indigenous demands for restitution, long-contested histories of colonial dispossession and property ownership in the aftermath of the German genocide of the Herero and Nama peoples in Namibia. Her talk will interrogate the trajectories of colonial ideology and practice from the scientific racism-inflected racial geographies and regimes of property ownership during German colonization and the still shrouded story of post-colonial western institutions’ imperial skull-collecting and…

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Free

Public History Colloquium Event–”Telling Diverse Stories: The National Park Service Women’s History Initiative and Collaboration in Historic Preservation”

June 4 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Zoom, CA
NPS Public History session on June 4, Page 1

Join the History Department’s Colloquium in Public History on Friday, June 4 at noon for a Zoom talk by Christopher E. Johnson (National Park Service), Anne Lindsay (Public History, CSU Sacramento), and Jenni Sorkin (History of Art and Architecture, UCSB). This presentation describes collaborative work completed under the Women’s History Initiative, one of three national initiatives authorized by the Secretary of the Interior in 2011 to foster greater representation in NPS programs. Johnson will discuss the NPS initiatives, while Profs. Sorkin…

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Page last modified: June 3, 2021