FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Keynote Lecture with Prof. Herman Bennett: “Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic”

The History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the keynote lecture of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series. The lecture, “Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic,” will be delivered by Prof. Herman L. Bennett. Herman L. Bennett is Professor at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. A scholar […]

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Center for Cold War Studies Talk: Nancy Mitchell, “Andrew Young: Challenging Anglo-Saxon Foreign Policy?”

Andrew Young, one of Martin Luther King’s top aides and a former member of Congress, served as Jimmy Carter’s ambassador to the United Nations. Outspoken and controversial, Young questioned prevailing Cold War assumptions. “Communism has never been a threat to me,” he said. “Racism has always been a threat—and that has been the enemy of all of my life.” Nancy Mitchell […]

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Lily Anne Welty Tamai, “Mixed-Race Black Identities in Postwar Japan and Okinawa”

The East Asia Center welcomes UCSB History alumna Dr. Lily Anne Welty Tamai (Asian American Studies, UCLA) for a talk on “Mixed-Race Black Identities in Postwar Japan and Okinawa.” Mixed-race people born at the end of World War II made history quietly with their families and their communities. Wars and the military occupations that followed, coupled with increased migration across […]

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CWWG Workshop–Mattie Webb, “Beyond Desegregation: Waging a Battle Against Apartheid in the South African Workplace”

On Saturday, April 24, from 2 to 4 pm, the Center for Cold War Studies and International History (CCWS) will host a workshop. They will read and discuss a dissertation chapter, “Beyond Desegregation: Waging a Battle Against Apartheid in the South African Workplace,” by Mattie Webb, a doctoral candidate in the UCSB history department. This workshop is part of a new […]

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar III: Racial Capitalism and Liberalism

Building on the collective knowledge shared in the two previous webinars, the History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the third and final session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within […]

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar II: Empire and Liberation

Building on the collective knowledge shared in our first webinar, the History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the second session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within it, the series […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Samiha Rahman, “Redefining Black Excellence: Ihsan, Islamic Education, and the Tijani Sufi Order”

Since the 1980s, hundreds of predominantly working-class African American Muslim youth have migrated to the West African Tijani Sufi town of Medina Baye, Senegal. They hope to circumvent the antiblackness, Islamophobia, and economic inequality they face in the U.S. in search of a transformative educational encounter in a society where Blackness and Islam constitute the dominant norms. This talk chronicles […]

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Adrienne Edgar, “Mixed Children in Soviet Central Asia: Dilemmas of Identity and Belonging”

The UCSB Department of Political Science‘s Identity Politics Group invites you to join them at a Workshop in which Professor Adrienne Edgar (History, UCSB) will present a chapter from her forthcoming book, Intimate Internationalism: Mixed Marriage in Soviet Central Asia. The chapter to be discussed is “Mixed Children in Soviet Central Asia: Dilemmas of Identity and Belonging.” Professor Paul Spickard […]

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AfroLatinx Voices Series: Re-Writing Black Religions in the Atlantic World–A Conversation with Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero

How might we re-write the history and historiography of religion, race, and art in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world? Prof. Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco) will discuss the role of historians in uncovering and debating ideas about the past of people of African descent during the colonial period. She invites us to consider the ways art, material […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Rasul Miller, “Black Internationalism and Black Sunni Muslims in America”

During the interwar period, the historic neighborhood of Harlem was home to a thriving Black political scene that included Garveyites, Communists, labor organizers, anticolonial activists, and politicized adherents of various new Black religious congregations. Shaykh Daoud Faisal and Mother Khadijah Faisal, the architects of New York City’s first lasting Black Sunni Muslim community worked as artists, organizers, and propagators of […]

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar I: Sovereignty and the Political

The History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the inaugural session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within it, the series brings together UCSB History faculty and graduate students who have […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Jason Young, “Look for Me in the Whirlwind: Toward an Ecology of Afro-Futurism”

Speaking before a rapt audience, famed black nationalist leader, Marcus Garvey, vowed to support the cause of African liberation not only in life, but also in death, insisting that he would return as an “earthquake, or a cyclone, or plague, or pestilence” to aid in the fight for freedom. He implored his followers: “Look for me in the whirlwind.” Using […]

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LAIS Tertulia | “Race and Caste in Latin America, India, and the USA: A Global Conversation”

Latin American and Iberian Studies invites you to a Tertulia in the Time of COVID, 2020-2021! Two History Department faculty members will speak at this exciting event. In her widely acclaimed book Caste: The Origins of our Discontents, Isabel Wilkerson complicates the category of race, as it is commonly understood in the US, by bringing caste to the fore. She […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. LaKisha Simmons, “The Ancestors and the Womb are One: Black Motherhood and Histories of Black Infant Loss”

Throughout the twentieth century, Black women in the United States experienced at least double the rates of infant mortality experienced by white women. Through an analysis of oral histories collected in the US South in the 1930s, Dr. LaKisha Simmons (University of Michigan) details what Patricia Hill Collins terms a “Black women’s standpoint on mothering.” From interviewees’ discussions of infant […]

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Job Talk: Taylor M. Moore’s “Amulet Tales: Political and Spiritual Economies of Healing in Egypt”

The History Department invites all to a job talk by Dr. Taylor M. Moore on January 13, 2021. Dr. Moore is a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the History Department at UC Santa Barbara. Her research lies at the intersections of critical race studies, decolonial/postcolonial histories of science, and decolonial materiality studies with a geographical focus on Egypt […]

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The Initiative for the Study of Race, Religion, and Revolution’s Winter 2021 Schedule

Professor Butch Ware and the ISRRAR announce the Winter Quarter schedule for HIST 210RA: Race, Faith, Revolution. Graduate students are invited to register for this 2-unit seminar and to sign up for the listserv at http://tinyurl.com/ISRRARListServ. How have Black metaphysics articulated with racial politics in order to advance efforts of justice, liberation, and self-actualization? In this very special year of […]

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Stuart Tyson Smith, “Black Pharaohs? Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations”

Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African & African American Research welcomes UCSB Professor of Anthropology (and History Department affiliate faculty member) Stuart Tyson Smith to the W.E.B. Du Bois Virtual Lecture Series. On Tuesday, September 22 Professor Smith will present his Zoom lecture “Black Pharaohs? Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations.” Register in advance for this free […]

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Ronny Regev, “‘We Want No More Economic Islands’: The Mobilization of the Black Consumer Market in the Postwar US”

On February 14 Ronny Regev (History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem) presents, “‘We Want No More Economic Islands’: The Mobilization of the Black Consumer Market in the Postwar US.” WWII ushered in an era of economic growth in the United States, which enshrined consumption as an integral part of liberal citizenship. African Americans were often excluded from the benefits of this […]

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David Stein, “Containing Keynesianism in an Age of Civil Rights: Jim Crow Monetary Policy and the Struggle for Guaranteed Jobs, 1956-1979”

David Stein headshot with stone wall in background

As part of the The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy‘s “The Political Economy of Racial Inequality” Fall Quarter speaker series, David Stein (African American Studies, University of California Los Angeles) will present “Containing Keynesianism in an Age of Civil Rights: Jim Crow Monetary Policy and the Struggle for Guaranteed Jobs, 1956-1979.” A UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, […]

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Colin Gordon, “Citizen Brown: Race, Democracy, and Inequality in the St. Louis Suburbs”

Colin Gordon headshot

As part of the The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy‘s “The Political Economy of Racial Inequality” Fall Quarter speaker series, Colin Gordon (History, University of Iowa) will present “Citizen Brown: Race, Democracy, and Inequality in the St. Louis Suburbs.” Gordon is an historian of US public policy, political economy, and urban history. He is the author […]

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