HIST201AM:
Advanced Historical Literature: Trade, Politics, and Power in Early North America and the Atlantic World

About the Course:

Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. Open to both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.
 
A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. AM. America.
This course will introduce graduate students to recent histories of Early North America and the Atlantic World, with an emphasis on the relationship between politics and markets, the entangled histories of capitalism, colonialism, and slavery, and the material basis of power. Readings include David Silverman, Thundersticks: Firearms and the Violent Transformation of Native America; Serena Zabin, Dangerous Economies: Status and Commerce in Imperial New York; Emma Hart, Trading Spaces: The Colonial Marketplace and the Foundations of American Capitalism; and Christy Clark-Pujura, Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island.

Pre-requisites:

No pre-requisites have been entered for this course.

Documents:

View the course’s GauchoSpace page or the instructor’s page for documents: Katie Moore   

Schedule of Courses

Go to the Schedule of Courses on the Registrar's website to register or view scheduling information on all courses.